Alcohol and the Covid Vaccine

If you’re set to get vaccinated against COVID-19, that’s definitely something to celebrate. But medical experts are cautioning the public against drinking alcohol immediately before and after your vaccination. Doctors say it’s best to wait a few days to do a shot after your shot.

Rather than reaching for the bottle, physicians are recommending that you do whatever you can to ramp up your immune system. That includes drinking lots of water, eating a healthy diet, taking your vitamins, and getting plenty of sleep.

With agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tracking vaccine reactions through their V-Safe Vaccination Health Checker survey system, another concern is that hangover symptoms can mimic some vaccine side effects. Just like a killer hangover, the vaccine can produce muscle aches and pains, nausea, headache, and fatigue in some recipients. 

But if you’ve already been vaccinated and inadvertently threw a few back, there’s probably no need to worry. Trial volunteers who received the Moderna and Pfizer Bio-N-Tech vaccines were not prohibited from drinking, and no unusual side effects were reported. There’s currently no evidence that combining alcohol with any of the vaccines reduces their efficacy or hinders someone’s ability to produce antibodies.

While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) haven’t released any formal guidelines about  COVID-19 vaccinations and alcohol consumption, other countries are issuing warnings about the risk of drinking and getting vaccinated. The U.K.”s National Health Service has instructed its citizens to briefly refrain from alcohol, while Russia has issued a much stricter advisory. Russian Deputy Prime Minister Tatiana Golikova warned citizens set to receive their Sputnik-V vaccine that in addition to wearing masks and following social distancing rules, they should also refrain from alcohol for at least 42 days in order to build sufficient immunity against the virus.

What’s the right approach for you if you’re concerned? That’s a conversation for you to have with your doctor or another qualified medical professional. Between the two of you, you’ll determine the approach that will keep you healthy, protect you from COVID-19th, and enjoy your life.

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